Just in Time (JIT)

Australian Winner Global Logistics and it's Distribution Centre in PR China  can provide "Just in Time" service to your business operation.

Just-in-time (JIT) is an inventory strategy implemented to improve the return on investment of a business by reducing in-process inventory and its associated carrying costs. In order to achieve JIT the process must have signals of what is going on elsewhere within the process. This means that the process is often driven by a series of signals, which can be Kanban, that tell production processes when to make the next part. Kanban are usually 'tickets' but can be simple visual signals, such as the presence or absence of a part on a shelf. When implemented correctly,

JIT can lead to dramatic improvements in a manufacturing organization's return on investment, quality, and efficiency. Some have suggested that "Just on Time" would be a more appropriate name since it emphasizes that production should create items that arrive when needed and neither earlier nor later.

Quick communication of the consumption of old stock which triggers new stock to be ordered is key to JIT and inventory reduction. This saves warehouse space and costs. However since stock levels are determined by historical demand any sudden demand rises above the historical average demand, the firm will deplete inventory faster than usual and cause customer service issues. Some have suggested that recycling Kanban faster can also help flex the system by as much as 10-30%. In recent years manufacturers have touted a trailing 13 week average as a better predictor for JIT planning than most forecastors could provide.

The below figure illustrates a relatively recent concept in the domain of industrial manufacturing – "just in time".

This new notion amplifies the role of freight transport, particularly in trucking. It involves the delivery of a component just before the assembly line requires it.

Consequently, freight forwarders must respect tighter delivery schedules and must plan their operations accordingly in order to avoid strict delay penalties. The production unit (the factory) assumes a lower level of warehousing. As a result, the trucks (vehicles) themselves assume the task of moving storage units, thus the inventory is constantly in circulation.